Monday, April 18, 2011

Prevailing Theories on the Bermuda Triangle | BoaterExam.com

Time Vortex


Prevailing Theories on the Bermuda Triangle

In the last century, numerous ships, small boats and aircrafts have purportedly vanished within the infamous Bermuda Triangle, or as some call it "The Devil's Triangle". The boundaries of the triangle cover the Straits of Florida, the Bahamas and the entire Caribbean island area, the Atlantic east to the Azores. Dating back to the voyages of Christopher Columbus, he had logged about bizarre compass bearings in the area.
The region got its name when Vincent Gaddis coined the term 'Bermuda Triangle' in a cover story for Argosy magazine about the disappearance of Flight 19. While the area is one of the most heavily traveled shipping lanes in the world many theorists have tried to explain unusual disappearances which have occurred in its borders.
These are their stories:
Time Vortex
Albert Einstein postulated that a curvature of space would cause even light to bend through it. Some theorists believe that "Time'", as a force of nature, can also get warped based on your location. The Bermuda Triangle is thus one location on earth where the fabric of time is so thin that travelers can slip through it and emerge on the other side of a completely different time.
This theory was solidified in 1970 when Floridian pilot Brue Gernon Jr., his father and friend Chuck Lafayette were flying toward Bimini Island in the Bahamas and noticed a strange elliptical cloud, which he later called Electronic Fog hovering only about 500 feet above the ocean.

Here is an excerpt of his story - and here are also the prevailing theories, of course:
Prevailing Theories on the Bermuda Triangle | BoaterExam.com

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